How to close the gaps in your resume

Posted by Amanda Augustine

May 06, 2014 @ 04:12 PM

Prove you’ve kept your skills relevant during time off by showcasing your unpaid experience. 

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You took time off to raise a family and now it’s time to return to the workforce. Whether your time off was voluntary or beyond your control, the job search can be daunting when your resume contains employment gaps.

Many stay-at-home parents fail to recognize the valuable experience they’ve gained while managing the household and raising children. Consider how many of the following core competencies can be attributed to you as you prepare to update your resume and return to the workforce.

Topics: Resume & Cover Letters

Employers hiring near you

Posted by Marc Cenedella

May 05, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

We have over seventy thousand employers looking for new employees on TheLadders, and we could use your help.

If you, or your friends or colleagues, could fit the bill for one of the below-listed jobs, please let us know by clicking through and applying.

Topics: Marc's Newsletter

How to answer the ‘Tell me about yourself’ interview question

Posted by Guest Contributor

May 01, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

Don’t be afraid of this question; instead use it as an opportunity to position yourself for success.

By Lee E. Miller

Interview_SkippyWhen I was a human resources executive doing hiring interviews, I almost always began my interviews with candidates by requesting, “Tell me about yourself.” I did that for a number of reasons, the most important of which was to see how the candidates handled themselves in an unstructured situation.

I wanted to see how articulate they were, how confident they were and generally what type of impression they would make on the people with whom they came into contact on the job.

I also wanted to get a sense of what they thought was important.

Most candidates find this question to be a particularly difficult one to answer. That is a misplaced view. This question offers an opportunity to describe yourself positively and focus the interview on your strengths. Be prepared to deal with it. These days, it’s unavoidable. Like me, most interviewers start off their interviews with this question. A lot of interviewers open with it as an icebreaker or because they're still getting organized, but they all use it to get a sense of whom you are.

Topics: Interviewing

The most important two minutes of your job interview

Posted by Amanda Augustine

April 29, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

You only get one first impression. Make it count with these job-search tips.

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This Saturday marks the 140th running of the Kentucky Derby; the “fastest two minutes in sports.” On that day, approximately twenty Thoroughbreds will race down one and a quarter miles of track at Churchill Downs, each competing for a piece of the multi-million dollar purse and a chance to be draped in a blanket of roses at the winner’s circle.

When a race is so short, every second counts. The smallest slipup out of the gates can destroy your chances of victory. The same can be said of the interview process. While an interview will certainly last longer than two minutes, the first few minutes of an interview can set the tone for the entire meeting. As Will Rogers once said, “You never get a second chance to make a good first impression.” [Tweet this]

With that in mind, here are some job-search tips to ensure your interview begins on the right foot.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Interviewing

When Bono, Warhol & famous people were rejected, too

Posted by Marc Cenedella

April 28, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

The accumulation of rejection letters, voicemails, emails, and, yes, unfortunately, text messages, is a good sign for any job search.  You need to go through a lot of maybes and uh-unhs before you find the right YES!

So you can imagine that famous people who were once not famous got a lot of rejection letters on their way up.

For example, here's Bono being turned down by RSO:

Topics: Job Search, Marc's Newsletter, Job Application & Follow Up

Gracefully decline a job offer

Posted by TheLadders

April 24, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

Keep it professional and there's nothing to be squeamish about when you turn down one job offer for another. Use this advice to explain your regrets.

By Andrew Klappholz

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It sounds too good to be true. One highly touted job seeker was hit with a perfect financial services storm: job offers from Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan Chase and Blackrock — all at the same time.

This was the situation facing one client of career coach Connie Thanasoulis-Cerrachio, a partner at SixFigureStart and former head of staffing for Merrill Lynch Asset Management.

Is it an embarrassment of riches to be presented with such wonderful opportunities in the wake of a global financial crisis? Sure, but this job seeker also had a difficult task on her hands. She had to turn down two of these three giants and do so in a way that protected her relationships and reputation at each.

In an era where very few can afford to burn any bridges, she handled the matter gracefully and honestly.

Topics: Salary & Negotiation, Working with Recruiters

7 important questions every job seeker should ask themselves

Posted by Amanda Augustine

April 22, 2014 @ 07:02 PM

Lay the groundwork for a successful job search by asking yourself these questions.

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Whether you’re just beginning the job hunt or you’ve been searching for months, it’s important to regularly monitor your activities and reevaluate your strategy. Keep your job search on track by asking yourself the following questions throughout the job-search process. 

Am I qualified for this position?

Read the job description carefully before you submit an application. Do you meet the core requirements of the role? Only apply to jobs where you possess these must-haves. If your dream job requires a skill you don’t have, brainstorm ways to develop this skill in or out of the office. 

Topics: Ask Amanda, Job Search

Can you afford to relocate?

Posted by TheLadders Contributor

April 22, 2014 @ 01:00 PM

Cost of living is key to consider when you are contemplating making a move.

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Once you get an offer in another city, you’ll probably do everything you can to see if the new job is in your kind of town. If it is, don’t say ‘yes’ right away — make sure the salary is enough to pay for your lifestyle in that particular place.

Your desired location might have all the amenities you can ever want close by, but that won’t mean anything if you couldn’t afford them. The trick is to get as much local pricing information as possible — everything from gas prices and rent to what it would cost to buy a cup of coffee and a movie ticket, said recent Chicago transplant Jacob Young, an SEO specialist and online reputation manager for Young Social Media. “Being that specific is really good because you can say, ‘Oh, when I go to the grocery store, I’ll know how much it’ll cost,’ ” he said.

Commodities don’t cost the same in Wichita as they do in San Francisco, and the things you regularly buy can add up quickly if you don’t account for them before you decide to relocate. “I have three things: grocery store, gas station and bistro — those are the three places I’m going to go to,” Young said.

Topics: Job Search, Relocation

Is relocation right for you?

Posted by TheLadders Contributor

April 21, 2014 @ 09:59 AM

Use local resources to help you decide whether a long-distance move will fit your lifestyle.

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So you’ve had it with the big city and you’re ready for the country life. Or maybe working in Middle America has run its course and you want to try living on one of the coasts for a while. People decide to relocate for a variety of reasons, and work is usually right at the top of that list. But before you pack your bags and forward your mail, there are some things to consider.

Many people get an idea in their head about a place that doesn’t reflect what life in that place is really like, says Jacob Young, an SEO specialist and online reputation manager for Young Social Media. Just because you once had a great vacation in southern California and fell in love with the San Diego Zoo doesn’t mean that everyone else at the zoo wasn’t miserable from battling the traffic.

Topics: Job Search, Relocation

Seeking VP, Anything

Posted by Marc Cenedella

April 21, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

In the job search, you must be precise and concrete about your value and career goals, and shape an elevator pitch that reflects them. 

"Oh, I'm looking for anything," you might tell well-meaning friends who ask.

It's a problem.

Because in today's economy, no employer is looking for a "VP, Anything", or a “Director of Whatever Needs to Be Done."  They're looking for an experienced professional who can solve specific problems.

When you're thinking about moving jobs, you need to have a brief, pithy assertion of who you are and what you're qualified to do.  It's important that you be able to explain to an old colleague, or a new connection, in 30 seconds or less, what it is that you're looking for.

Topics: Job Search, Personal Branding, Marc's Newsletter