Quitting your job? There's an app for that

Posted by TheLadders

January 07, 2014 @ 06:36 PM

Adding a splash of humor to the otherwise serious job search, we decided to team up with the creators of BreakupText to bring disgruntled employees the Quit Your Job app. With just a few taps, the iPhone app generates personalized, and quite colorful, resignation messages.

Now, it should be noted that, while the end recipient of the message is entirely up to the user, we don't actually recommend terminating employment via text message - the app is intended for entertainment purposes only.  

Quit_Your_JobUpon launching the app, the user is prompted to “Begin the End” by choosing options for why s/he is quitting, what s/he plans to do next, and who s/he wants to send the text message to. An elaborate text message is then sent to the intended recipient, and the user is brought to a screen that enables social sharing via Twitter and Facebook.

For those who prefer to secure a new job before leaving their current gig, TheLadders has the most intuitive job-matching app in market, which is now available for Android users. Leveraging matching, learning, and proprietary algorithms, TheLadders’ technology reduces friction and facilitates the industry’s quickest turnaround times in the job-search process. The iPhone version of the app, which launched six months ago, has been downloaded more than 500,000 times.

To learn more about TheLadders Android app, click here

 

 

 

 

Topics: TheLadders Dev

Our new and improved mobile app for iOS7

Posted by TheLadders

December 09, 2013 @ 09:00 AM

TheLadders iPhone app for job seekers, Job Search by TheLadders, is new and improved! TheLadders_2.0

We’ve updated our mobile app, Job Search by TheLadders, for iPhone users. Those of you on iOS 7 will be greeted with a sleek, redesigned experience. Both iOS 6 and iOS 7 users will benefit from performance optimizations and bug fixes. 

Topics: TheLadders Dev

Hacker School says goodbye to 137 Varick Street

Posted by Guest Contributor

August 23, 2013 @ 10:45 PM

Capture1-1

Hacker School began life in a small classroom donated by NYU. In the two years since our first batch, it’s grown from six students to 70, and we’ve been housed in everything from a windowless room in Chelsea to a fancy office building on East 9th Street. We’ve even run it in DUMBO lofts and a mezzanine scheduled to be demolished. Hacker School has always been defined by the people and ideas that animate it, and not where it’s located.

Topics: Life @TheLadders, TheLadders Dev

Immersing TheLadders in mobile technology, one device at a time

Posted by Kyri Sarantakos

August 15, 2013 @ 10:33 PM

Back in June, with the company’s 10-year anniversary on the horizon, CEO and Co-founder Alex Douzet and I reflected on how far we’ve come. Marc Cenedella started the company as a small, weekly email personally sent to a few subscribers. Ten years and many-million lines of code later, we’re distributing job matches and the most relevant job information to more than 6 million job seekers online, via email, on our mobile-optimized website and through our mobile app.

App-on-Phone

This conversation led us to a realization: we just released our native iOS app and saw that many of our employees did not have iPhones to use it. We, as a mobile-first job-matching and information service, need to be immersed in the technology that we’re expected to create, update, sell, promote, and troubleshoot with job seekers. It’s not just the product team who needs to understand the mobile platform and its unique nuances – it’s all of us. Our customer support team needs to translate the benefits and troubleshoot with our customer base; the PR team needs to communicate the app’s differentiation to the media; the B2B sales team needs to understand and communicate how the app improves the employer experience.

Topics: Life @TheLadders, TheLadders Dev

Part 3: What “Lean UX” looks like - a story of product development

Posted by Michelle Zassenhaus

July 11, 2013 @ 11:06 AM

The third part in a multi-part series about the "Lean UX" approach to product development at TheLadders.

We created the app because it was clear our customers needed an on-the-go solution for their job search. What was unclear was exactly how we could best deliver value to them. We had some hypotheses about that and did some quick tests – both on the jobseeker and the recruiter sides. These tests provided essential direction and built empathy around the specific beliefs, goals and challenges of the users our product was serving. But how to move forward?

Start with scenarios

Armed with a better understanding of users’ needs, it was time to take a stab at what the product would look like. This moment can be paralyzing, but I like to conquer it by designing scenarios. This means imagining what each screen would look like during a single complete session in which a typical job seeker uses the app. This approach helps you understand how each part of the system needs to be threaded together to create a simple experience from the user’s point of view.  Once the broad strokes are established, I can circle back and consider the implications this has for the overall system, and what special conditions and states need to be considered.

Topics: Life @TheLadders, TheLadders Dev

Introducing TheLadders app!

Posted by Benjamin Grohé

June 19, 2013 @ 10:03 PM

TheLadders' team is proud to introduce their first native iOS app for job seekers!

Topics: TheLadders Dev

Can you be agile when you “ship software”?

Posted by Benjamin Grohé

June 17, 2013 @ 10:29 AM

Our head of product, Ben Grohe, shares how we found a way to use multivariate testing during the app development process.

Soon after we started developing our first mobile app, we realized that we are now building “shipping software,” rather than a website or web services. There are fundamental differences between the two, which proved to be a big challenge for our team—particularly, given our desire to continue using best practices of agile and lean development.

Product development at TheLadders

Before I continue, allow me to quickly give you some background on how we develop products at TheLadders. We live and breathe agile and lean development day in and day out. If you haven’t read it already, my colleague Michelle wrote a great article about how we work in cross-functional teams in our company. If I had to sum it up, our mantras are:

  • Communication and working software over documentation
  • Actual data and user feedback over assumptions
  • Product iterations over extensive planning

Topics: TheLadders Dev

Part 2: What “Lean UX” looks like - a story of product development

Posted by Michelle Zassenhaus

May 24, 2013 @ 07:46 AM

The second part in a multi-part series about the "Lean UX" approach to product development at TheLadders.

Last time we met, I introduced the concept of "Lean UX", and discussed how we're putting it to work in the development of our mobile application. We got our arms around the core hypotheses, and did some quick tests with users. Next, we wanted to see how our concepts would shake out with recruiters - because after all, we can't make job seekers happy if they aren't hearing from the people who have the jobs.

The Meaning of "Team" (and why it's essential to Lean UX)

Before going further, please allow me a brief interlude on what it means to be a "team" at TheLadders. We work in a loose agile/scrum approach (more buzzwords!) - which essentially means that cross-functional teams take on a problem statement and solve them independently. While the size of the teams vary, they often follow this configuration: development team (3-5 engineers including Q/A), a scrum master (or tech lead), a product owner, a UX designer, and a Visual Designer. (Additionally, copywriters work across teams.) The scrum master, product owner and UX designer form a sort of trifecta of team leadership, but in general, the entire team collaborates around creating solutions.

Topics: Life @TheLadders, TheLadders Dev

Getting “Uncubed”

Posted by TheLadders Contributor

May 22, 2013 @ 12:31 PM

Sean talks about getting "uncubed" with some of the most influential folks from NYC's technology sector.

I'll admit it, I love attending job fairs. Sure, it's an incredibly exhausting experience to talk to one person after another for several hours. However, if you thrive on interacting with others, it is also hugely stimulating. I've attended a number of job fairs lately looking for great engineers to join our team here at TheLadders. 

Uncubed, which we attended Friday, is one of my favorites. It bills itself as something of an "un-job fair." I'm going to respectively disagree with them. Uncubed is everything I love about job fairs but taken up a notch. The energy level is higher. Perhaps it's the music, or the food, or the alcohol that flows freely. Maybe it's the electricity that is New York City and its citizens. Whatever it is, Uncubed feels different. Louder. Stronger. Faster. Better.

Topics: Life @TheLadders, TheLadders Dev

Part 1: What “Lean UX” looks like - a story of product development

Posted by Michelle Zassenhaus

May 01, 2013 @ 05:02 AM

The first part in a multi-part series about the "Lean UX" approach to product development at TheLadders.

There are lots of buzz words flying around in product development these days, but what they are and how they are applied can be hard to grasp. I'd like to pull the curtain back and share how we've been applying “Lean UX” in product development at TheLadders.

My team has been working on an iPhone application for our job seekers, which is due to launch in the coming months. As Lead User Experience Designer on the project, I have collaborated closely with my team, applying a "Lean UX" approach - which TheLadders is known for, thanks to the great work of Jeff Gothelf and Will Evans, my predecessors here. In this multi-part series, I'll share with you how we got through the early, foggy stages of product definition quickly; how we built out the guts of our app while constantly testing with users; and a cutting-edge long-term study we're running with real users for the last two months of development, while we refine the last set of features.

Topics: Life @TheLadders, TheLadders Dev