Video chat: Negotiating your worth

Posted by Amanda Augustine

02:57 PM

A follow-up on some of the most popular questions asked during TheLadders spreecast on negotiation.

A big thank you to everyone who attended our interactive video chat on Negotiating Your Worth. I had a great time and I hope you did too!  Click on the following links to view the entire spreecast and to obtain a copy of a presentation I created on the topic for TheLadders’ Job Central event. Below are some of the questions I fielded and links to more information on the topics.

As always, you can learn more about the job search and find out about our upcoming spreecasts by following me at @JobSearchAmanda on Twitter and liking my Facebook page. Now on to the questions!

TheLadders job search expert Amanda Augustine

Topics: Ask Amanda, Salary

Negotiate with confidence

Posted by Amanda Augustine

02:00 AM

Don’t just know your worth, know how to sell it.

TheLadders & iVillage believe in negotiating your worth

iVillage Chief Correspondent Kelly Wallace and I spoke with Kathie Lee and Hoda on the TODAY show about a survey iVillage released on women in the workplace. According to the survey, only 35 percent of the 1,500 women polled online have ever asked for a raise, and less than 20 percent have ever asked for a promotion.

The fact of the matter is, if you don’t ask for what you want, you won’t get it – you have to negotiate. We see this all the time in the workplace. Men expect the raise and ask for it; women keep their nose to the grindstone, hoping their hard work will be recognized and, hopefully, rewarded.

By not negotiating, you are setting yourself up to lose hundreds of thousands of dollars over the lifetime of your career. To Sheryl Sandberg’s point, we have to “lean in” if we want more. Here are a several ways you can set yourself up for successful negotiations.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Salary

Why didn't I get the job?

Posted by Guest Contributor

11:40 AM

Ten popular reasons that prevent job applicants from receiving offers.

By Ken Sundheim

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While there are hundreds of reasons why job interviews don't go as well as they could, some are more common than others. Though, contrary to popular belief, not all outcomes are the interviewer’s fault, nor are the outcomes always in the interviewer’s control. Here are ten popular reasons that prevent job applicants from receiving offers:

1. The interviewee has not done his or her research on the company

When the interviewee has not done his or her research on the company they are interviewing with, there is virtually no chance they will get the offer. Despite how much the company likes them as a person or how fitting their past experience is, showing a lack of knowledge regarding the company you’re interviewing with results in instant rejection.  

2. There is a disconnect in personalities between the interviewer and interviewee

It’s not uncommon for the personalities of the interviewer and interviewee to clash. While the most successful people learn how to get along with others, sometimes it simply doesn't work out.  

Topics: Interview, Salary

How to respond to the question, “What are your salary requirements?”

Posted by Amanda Augustine

09:58 PM

Research the going rate for your target job now so you're prepared to answer salary requirement questions during the interview. [TWEET]

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Q: When asked about my salary requirements, I never know what to say. If I say a low figure, they have no reason to offer more money. If I give a figure that’s too high, they may disregard me as a candidate. What’s the right response? – Deb H.

A: The first rule of salary negotiation is to avoid discussing numbers until the company has extended an offer. This is when you have the most power to negotiate. But as any job seeker will tell you, this is no simple feat. Recruiters typically try to pull this information out of you as early as the initial phone screen, if they didn’t already request your salary requirements as part of the application process.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Interview, Salary

The limbo of underemployment

Posted by Paige Tintle

12:11 PM

Underemployed 199x300To some it means working a part-time job when they’d prefer to be full-time or being an “involuntary part-time worker.” Taking a job where you are overqualified and underpaid is also considered underemployed – although sometimes a necessary step.

In the current economic state job seekers might feel that being underemployed and underutilized is an I’ll-deal-with-it-because-I-need-a-job situation.

Topics: Salary

Salary Negotiation Tips: Monetizing Without ''Dollar-izing''

Posted by Guest Contributor

02:27 PM

How to talk money at an interview with a nonprofit.

By Jack Chapman

artSalaryEditor's note: Salary expert Jack Chapman and TheLadders want to help you negotiate the best deal you can. You can e-mail us your salary negotiation questions or situations or use #salaryQ to submit them via Twitter. Due to the volume of inquiries, we may not be able to respond to all questions submitted.

Q: I am currently the vice-president of a non-profit earning $62K a year plus good benefits. I am also a candidate for two similar positions with two other not-for-profits. Both probably pay between $100K & $150K. How should I discuss my previous salary, which I have successfully avoided thus far (but it is public record, so only a matter of time). What strategy do I need to get up at the high end of the range? I fear being possibly perceived as a less experienced candidate.

Topics: Salary

Salary Negotiation Tips: Disclosure Sabotage

Posted by Guest Contributor

04:10 PM

Did I ruin my chances by disclosing my past salary?

By Jack Chapman

artSalaryEditor's note: Salary expert Jack Chapman and TheLadders want to help you negotiate the best deal you can. You can e-mail us your salary negotiation questions or situations or use #salaryQ to submit them via Twitter. Due to the volume of inquiries, we may not be able to respond to all questions submitted.

Q: Did I sabotage my chances for the position because I disclosed my past salary (or salary range) and it was too high?

Topics: Salary

Salary negotiation tips: Playing it straight

Posted by Guest Contributor

01:48 PM

Did I ruin my chances by disclosing my past salary?

By Jack Chapman

artSalaryEditor's note: Salary expert Jack Chapman and TheLadders want to help you negotiate the best deal you can. You can e-mail us your salary negotiation questions or situations or use #salaryQ to submit them via Twitter. Due to the volume of inquiries, we may not be able to respond to all questions submitted.

Q: Did I sabotage my chances for the position because I disclosed my past salary (or salary range) and it was too high?

Topics: Salary

Salary negotiation tips: Making the right decision on your bottom-line number

Posted by Guest Contributor

01:52 PM

Apply these 6 criteria to help you decide when the best alternative to a negotiated agreement isn't good enough.

By Jack Chapman

artSalaryEditor's note: Salary expert Jack Chapman and TheLadders want to help you negotiate the best deal you can. You can e-mail us your salary negotiation questions or situations or use #salaryQ to submit them via Twitter. Due to the volume of inquiries, we may not be able to respond to all questions submitted. Our inaugural question addresses how to decide if an offer is right for you.

Q: What if a job offer has been made, and after a thorough and exhaustive negotiation, the maximum the employer can offer (salary plus future raise potential) is still less than your bottom-line (no-go) number? What is the checklist or thought process you should go through to make the right decision?

Topics: Salary

Salary Negotiation Isn't Pretty

Posted by Guest Contributor

03:30 PM

When it comes to salary, women tend to take the agreeable route to avoid negotiating. But it doesn’t have to be a choice.

By Lee E. Miller and Jessica Miller

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EDITORS’ NOTE: This article is adapted from the just-released "A Woman’s Guide to Successful Negotiating" (McGraw-Hill, 2010) by Lee E. Miller and Jessica Miller.

Davia Temin, president of Temin & Co. and former head of corporate marketing for General Electric Capital, remembers the exact moment she realized “almost everything is negotiable if you see it that way.” When she got out of business school, she accepted her first job as assistant to the director of development at the Columbia Business School without really negotiating.

While working there, however, she saw something that changed her view of what was possible. She had always assumed if you weren’t accepted at Columbia you either went to another business school or pursued something else. A few students, however, when they were rejected, sought out the director of admissions and asked what they could do to change her mind. To Davia’s amazement, the director did not simply send them away. She told them if they took four semesters of Advanced Calculus and Statistics and got an A in each, she would admit them. A handful of students took her up on her offer and were admitted. At that point Davia realized that, "way more things were negotiable than I had previously thought." So she decided to learn how to negotiate.

Topics: Salary