Age discrimination is mindset discrimination

Posted by Marc Cenedella

July 21, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

One of the things I was most surprised by when I got into the jobs business over a decade ago was the prevalence and practice of age discrimination in hiring right here in the USA.

Oh, sure... we're not like some overseas markets where job ads explicitly demand youth, or a particular gender, or beauty(!), in the applicant, but there it is...

The blank look on your interviewer's face when you talk about growing up in the 60s or 70s. The skepticism with which your Snap-twit-facebook-whats-gram-app skills are regarded.  The cultural references that pass silently like two Teslas in the night... 

Well, at least the younger generation seems to get your reference to "Gunga-galunga" and giggle.

Most of the time.

All of it adds up to a pernicious undercutting of your ability to get hired and get ahead.  We have to admit the ugly truth that age discrimination exists -- there's no doubt about it.

Topics: Marc's Newsletter, Age and Your Job Search

In the job search & over 50: Part III of III

Posted by Amanda Augustine

October 05, 2012 @ 08:30 AM

The third and final article in a three-part series on conducting a job search later in life.

TheLadders_Age_Discrimination_InterviewAge discrimination doesn’t disappear once you’ve made it to the interviewing phase with a job opportunity. Read on for tips to help you maneuver around interview questions designed to reveal your age.

INTERVIEWING & FOLLOW-UP

Before you head into an interview, do your research.  Visit Vault, Glassdoor and the company’s employment page on the web to get a better sense of the company culture. If you have any connections to the company, reach out to them for an informational interview to help you prepare. Depending on the company, you may need to adjust your interview wardrobe. For instance, if you walked into an interview at Google wearing a full suit and tie, you would look out of place.  Set a Google News Alert for the company in the days leading up to the interview so you stay up-to-date with relevant news.

Know your rights. There are certain questions that are off-limits – including those about your age. Oftentimes the interviewer isn’t aware of these laws, and is naively trying to break the ice by asking about your family, which may lead to inappropriate questions. In these cases, the best thing to do is redirect the question back to the interviewer. For instance, if they ask about your marital status, you can reply by saying, “It sounds like family is important to you. Are you married?” You’ve kept up the friendly chitchat without having to divulge any information about your personal life.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Interview, Age and Your Job Search

In the job search & over 50: Part II of III

Posted by Amanda Augustine

October 04, 2012 @ 08:30 AM

The second article in a three-part series on conducting a job search later in life.

20130619_AskAmanda_Job_Application_Checklist_v2After you’ve determined the right job goals for your search and developed a resume to support them, it’s time to begin your job-search campaign. Below are tips on how to advertise your brand on and offline, as well as pursue opportunities through multiple channels.

PERSONAL BRANDING

In Jobvite's 2012 Social Recruiting Survey of 800+ HR professionals and recruiters in the US, it was found that 92 percent of employers and recruiters use social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn for recruiting. The survey reported that 73 percent of companies found a new hire through social media (the largest percentage – 89 percent – came through LinkedIn). This means the job seeker never even submitted an application – the employer or recruiter found them because of their online presence. In addition, 86 percent of recruiters admitted to reviewing candidates’ social network profiles – whether or not the candidates gave them that information.

Bottom line? If you’re not utilizing these channels to brand yourself and pursue opportunities, you’re missing out on a number of job leads that may not be published anywhere else. Building a strong online brand that supports your job goals, aligns with your resume and highlights your accomplishments and areas of expertise is imperative in today’s job market.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Networking, Personal Branding, Working with Recruiters, Job Application, Age and Your Job Search

In the job search & over 50: Part I of III

Posted by Amanda Augustine

October 03, 2012 @ 12:36 AM

The first article in a three-part series on conducting a job search later in life. 

TheLadders_Combatting_Age_DiscriminationAs many of you mentioned in your comments on my previous article, not everyone who’s 50 years old or older has the luxury of an encore career.

Many job seekers need a full-time job with full-time pay, and are feeling the negative effects of a down economy. I’m not going to sugarcoat it – finding a job in general is more challenging than ever. Trying to find a new job later in life can be even more frustrating. Studies have shown that employees in their 50s or older are not only more likely to be laid off during hard economic times, but they’re also known to have longer periods of unemployment before they are able to re-enter the workforce. There are a number of factors at play here, including age discrimination.

It may not be fair, but it’s real — age discrimination is alive and well in today’s workplace. We could talk for hours how recruiters, hiring managers — society as a whole — should change their mind-set, but that isn’t going to help you land a job any faster. What we really need to discuss is what you can do to compete against other candidates — regardless of their age — in today’s job market.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Goal Setting, Resume, Age and Your Job Search

7 tips for starting a second career

Posted by Amanda Augustine

September 19, 2012 @ 12:09 AM

What you need to know about pursuing an encore career later in life. 

Encore_CareerQuestion: 

I am 65 and nowhere near ready to retire (physically and emotionally) but I need to find more meaningful work than I'm doing now. What's the best way to overcome the age issue when approaching potential employers? – J.F. of Annapolis, MD

Answer: 

I can’t tell you how many people I’ve spoken to recently who are looking for new opportunities later in life!

Do me a favor and Google the following term today: “encore career

An “encore career,” also called “recareering,” is defined as an employment transition made during the latter part of one’s career, typically to the social sector or a public-interest field, such as education, the environment, health care, government, social services or nonprofits.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Changing Careers, Age and Your Job Search

Job Search in Your 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s

Posted by Guest Contributor

January 24, 2011 @ 02:01 PM

As you age, you will want to change the types of jobs you seek, the personal brand you introduce, even the way you present your resume.

By Debra Donston-Miller

090304resumemagnify3Whether you are 22 or 62, a job search may be in your future. But the 20-something's job search strategy should look very different than the 60-something's — and so should everyone's in between.

Especially in this economy, people of all ages are in the market for a new job. Some people are looking to improve their pay or title, some want to change their career paths and some have been involuntarily plunged into a job search due to downsizing. No matter what the catalyst, a job search should be carefully calculated and cultivated, with a great many factors taken into account. One of the most important, but often overlooked, is the impact the job seeker's age can and should have on the process.

Topics: New to the Workforce, Age and Your Job Search, Job Search Process