The 8-minute resume

Posted by Marc Cenedella

October 06, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

I always recommend you get your resume professionally written, but for those of you who have a "do-it-yourself" mentality, I've put together this simple 8-minute guide. It'll take you 8 minutes to read, probably an hour or two to do, and provide months of benefit in reducing your resume anxiety. 

My recommendations below are for a professional with 10 to 25 years experience. For those with fewer than 10 years, you're likely better off with a 1-page resume, for those with more than 25 years and at very senior levels, three may sometimes be appropriate. But seriously, if that's you, you shouldn't be relying on your own typing skills to market yourself. 

As with any "do-it-yourself" project, the key to success is to not get in over your head. So the instructions below are a simplified version of my best advice, tailored to be achievable by you on your own. Again, I must recommend that it's much better for you to get a professional to do this for you, but if you're set on "do it yourself", here goes!.... 

Topics: Marc's Newsletter

The top interviewing tricks of successful job seekers

Posted by Guest Contributor

September 30, 2014 @ 06:25 PM

Set yourself apart from the competition with these top job-interview tips.

By Ken Sundheim

artInterviewing

In a decade of recruiting for countless sales and marketing jobs spanning numerous industries and locations, there is a reliable stable of tricks I've seen job seekers use to put themselves ahead of the crowd in any interviewing situation. 

Below are the top three tactics I’ve seen that will take your interviewing to the next level, bringing you more and better employment offers.

Topics: Interview

9 questions to ask during an informational interview (and 1 to avoid)

Posted by Amanda Augustine

September 30, 2014 @ 08:30 AM

Arrive at your next informational interview prepared to gain valuable insights for your next career move.

informational_interview

It’s nearly impossible to discuss job-search tactics without mentioning the value of networking. Smart job seekers not only invest in developing their professional networks; they also tap into these connections for introductions, job leads and other valuable insights. However, one networking technique is often overlooked by even the savviest of job seekers: informational interviewing. [TWEET]

The concept of the informational interview (also known as an informational conversation) was first introduced by Richard N. Bolles, author of the popular job-search book, What Color is Your Parachute? Bolles believes that job seekers should speak with professionals in their field of interest to gather more information before choosing a particular career path.

I couldn’t agree more.

Whether you’re new to the workforce or you’re considering changing careers, informational interviews are a great way explore various career options and clarify your job goals.  Furthermore, they can be an effective way to gather insight into a particular company when you’re preparing for an interview.

Below are nine questions you can ask during your next informational interview – and one to avoid – to make the most of this valuable opportunity.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Networking, Goal Setting, New to the Workforce, Changing Careers

My single best tip

Posted by Marc Cenedella

September 29, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

In the decade I've been writing this newsletter, the single best tip I've given, that has come back to me over, and over, and over again, is this:

When it gets to that part of the interview with your future boss where they ask, "well, do you have any questions for me?", say yes, and ask:

"How do I help you get a gold star on your review next year?"

Topics: Marc's Newsletter

10 ways to boost your professional brand

Posted by Amanda Augustine

September 23, 2014 @ 09:36 PM

Build a strong professional image in and out of the workplace to advance your career.

If you want to get ahead at the office, you need to establish a professional brand on and offline that emphasizes your strengths and supports your job goals. 

Here are ten ways to boost your professional image in and out of the workplace to help you achieve your long-term career goals. [TWEET]

 

Topics: Ask Amanda, Personal Branding

Lessons learned from my last 1,200 job rejections

Posted by Guest Contributor

September 22, 2014 @ 10:22 AM

By Scott Ginsberg

Rejection_Application

I believe in building a brand from the inside out. Creating a high enough volume of daily output that the market targets you. Allowing new opportunities to find you through the attraction of working, not the agony of waiting.

That’s how I’ve successfully run my business for the past fifteen years.

But as an experiment, as a way of testing my own system, I recently spent a summer doing the exact opposite. Filling out job applications, responding to proposals, going on interviews, meeting with recruiters, submitting my portfolio for freelance gigs and seeking out new work opportunities.

By the end of the summer, I had been rejected over twelve hundred times.

Twelve hundred times.

And despite my best efforts, not a single one of those opportunities came to fruition. But as disappointing as the process was, I learned key lessons about career management. Next time you get rejected from a job application, remember these tenants:

Topics: Job Application

Please review the other candidates for this job first

Posted by Marc Cenedella

September 22, 2014 @ 08:00 AM

Use your job competition to your advantage with this eye-opening feature from TheLadders.

Would you like to see the name, title, compensation, work history and educational background of each person applying to the same jobs you're applying to here at TheLadders?

Well, I can't show you name, and sometimes I need to truncate the title in order preserve anonymity, but our popular feature "Scout" shows you the compensation, skills, title, work and educational background as well as overall years of experience for each applicant to the jobs posted directly here on TheLadders.

Topics: Marc's Newsletter

Work-from-home tips that will actually make you more productive

Posted by Guest Contributor

September 19, 2014 @ 08:39 AM

Get more done at home and watch your work prosper with this advice.

By Peter Schiller

Typing_Keyboard_Laptop

Working from home is becoming increasingly common—the number of those who worked at least one day a week from home increased from 7 percent in 1997 to 9.5 percent in 2010 (the most recent year for which figures are available). Whether you are a full-time staffer who works from the comfort of your couch occasionally, or a freelancer with a home office that’s always open, these five tips will help you make those offsite days the most productive they can be. Read on for some helpful hints that may surprise you, even if you’ve been doing this “homework” thing for ages.

Topics: Entrepreneur, Workplace

6 signs your job is at risk

Posted by Amanda Augustine

September 16, 2014 @ 12:01 PM

Don’t wait for the ax to fall. Learn how to read the signs that your job's on the line.

Job_Stress_Security

Even the best employees worry about their job security from time to time. In fact, a recent Gallup poll found that only 58 percent of U.S. full- and part-time workers are completely satisfied with their job security. Sadly, this represents the highest level recorded since the Great Recession (2009 – 2013) when about 50 percent felt secure in their jobs. While feelings of job security may be on the rise, it’s clear that many professionals across the U.S. are still kept up at night worrying about their jobs.

If your gut is telling you something is off at the office, don’t ignore it. Look for the following signs to determine if your job may be in danger.

Topics: Ask Amanda, Changing Careers, Resignation

6 tips for getting your job search started

Posted by Guest Contributor

September 15, 2014 @ 09:05 AM

By Robert Jones of Money Crashers

Dollar_Search

Whether you're looking for your first job, or you've been in the game for a while and are considering a change in careers, you may have better opportunities now than in the recent past. According to Gallup, the National Jobs Creation Index recently reached its highest point in the last six years. Instead of just basking in the good news and hoping the market does the work for you, adopt a proactive attitude in order to beat the competition. To help get on the company dime faster, check out these six job-search tips.

Topics: New to the Workforce